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Serum zinc and pneumonia in nursing home elderly.
  BACKGROUND: Zinc plays an important role in immune function. The association between serum zinc and pneumonia in the elderly has not been studied. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine whether serum zinc concentrations in nursing home elderly are associated with the incidence and duration of pneumonia, total and duration of antibiotic use, and pneumonia-associated and all-cause mortality. DESIGN: This observational study was conducted in residents from 33 nursing homes in Boston, MA, who participated in a 1-y randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled vitamin E supplementation trial; all were given daily doses of 50% of the recommended dietary allowance of essential vitamins and minerals, including zinc. Participants with baseline (n = 578) or final (n = 420) serum zinc concentrations were categorized as having low (<70 mug/dL) or normal (>/=70 mug/dL) serum zinc concentrations. Outcome measures included the incidence and number of days with pneumonia, number of new antibiotic prescriptions, days of antibiotic use, death due to pneumonia, and all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Compared with subjects with low zinc concentrations, subjects with normal final serum zinc concentrations had a lower incidence of pneumonia, fewer (by almost 50%) new antibiotic prescriptions, a shorter duration of pneumonia, and fewer days of antibiotic use (3.9 d compared with 2.6 d) (P
   
Type Journal - Bibliographic Record
Resource Type
(If applicable)
Author(s) Meydani SN, Barnett JB, Dallal GE, Fine BC, Jacques PF, Leka LS, Hamer DH.
Book Publisher
Journal Publisher Am J Clin Nutr
Year 2007
Pages 1167-73
Article Title
Edition 86
Contact Information
(If applicable)
Comments
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